Disaster Preparedness
In the event of a disaster, do you have Special Medical Needs?

Subscribe Now to receive public safety alerts to your cell phone, home phone, unlisted number or other mobile device about significant emergency events going on in Brunswick County that would affect you and your family.

North Carolina 2-1-1. Get Connected. Get Answers.

Get up to date road conditions.
   
   
Checklist & Planning
Hurricanes
Flooding
Tornadoes
Severe Weather
Extreme Temperatures
Fires
Nuclear Safety
 
Hurricanes are tropical cyclones that rotate counterclockwise with wind speeds in excess of 74 mph.

Most hurricanes form over warm seas near the equator. They are created when the sun heats the ocean surface, causing heated water vapor to rise, condense, and form clouds. These clouds begin to spiral as the earth rotates. More air is pulled underneath and a large vortex is formed.
   
On average, six Atlantic hurricanes develop each year. When a hurricane moves toward coastal areas it often causes severe damage. Strong winds create storm surges, floods, rip tides and even spawn tornadoes. As the hurricane moves foward, it right front quadrant is typically where the most devastation occurs.

Hurricane Season begins June 1st and continues through November 30th. Be sure to practice hurricane preparedness and learn about hurricane safety and survival.


The Saffir-Simpson Scale

The National Oceanic and Atomospheric Administration (NOAA) uses this disaster potential scale. There are five categories, one being the least potential damage and five being the worst. Every hurricane is a potential threat to life and property. The category of the storm does not directly relate to the damage it will inflict. It is imperative to take every storm seriously.

Category
Wind Speeds
Storm Surge
Effects
1
74 - 95 mph
4 - 5 ft.
Minor Damage
2
96 - 110 mph
6 - 8 ft.
Major Damage
3
111 - 130 mph
9 - 12 ft.
Extensive Damage
4
131 - 154 mph
13 - 18 ft.
Extreme Damage
5
155 + mph
19 - 25 ft.
Catastrophic Damage

Storm Terminology

Tropical Disturbance
: A moving area of thunderstorms in the tropics.

Tropical Wave: A westward-moving, low-pressure trough in the deep easterly current that tends to organize low-level circulation. It sometimes travels thousands of miles with little change in shape, producing showers and thunderstorms along its path.

Tropical Depression
: An area of low pressure, rotary circulation of clouds and winds up to 38 miles per hour.

Tropical Storm
: Counterclockwise circulation of clouds and winds (develops over warm tropical waters) with windspeeds ranging from 39-73 miles per hour. At this stage, the storm is assigned a name.

Hurricane
: A tropical storm with windspeeds of 74 miles per hour or more, and dangerously high water and waves.

"Eye" of the Hurricane
: The relatively calm area near the center of the storm where winds are light, and the sky often is partly cloudy. The calm area is deceptive because it is bordered by maximum-force winds and torrential rains; it can last from several minutes to more than an hour.

Storm Surge
: An abnormal rise in sea level produced by the strong winds and low pressure within a hurricane. The storm surge occurs in the right half of the storm as it makes landfall. The storm surge potentially could elevate sea level from 2-20 feet. (9 out of 10 hurricane-related deaths occur as a result of storm surge rather than winds.) For more information about storm surge, visit

Advisory
: Hurricane and storm information delivered to the public every six hours.

Intermediate Advisory
: Hurricane and storm information updated every 2-3 hours, or as necessary.

Special Advisory
: Hurricane and storm information delivered when there is a significant change in storm-related weather conditions or warnings.

Gale Warning
: An advisory that 39-54 mph sustained winds and strong wave action are expected.

Storm Warning
: An advisory that 55-73 mph sustained winds and strong wave action are expected.

Hurricane Watch
: An announcement of possible hurricane conditions, for a particular area, within 36 hours.

Hurricane Warning
: A advisory that a hurricane is expected to strike a specified area within 24 hours or less.

2009 - 2013 Storm Names
 
2009
2010
2011
2012
2013
Ana
Bill
Claudette
Danny
Erika
Fred
Grace
Henri
Ida
Joaquin
Kate
Larry
Mindy
Nicholas
Odette
Peter
Rose
Sam
Teresa
Victor
Wanda
Alex
Bonnie
Colin
Danielle
Earl
Fiona
Gaston
Hermine
Igor
Julia
Karl
Lisa
Matthew
Nicole
Otto
Paula
Richard
Shary
Tomas
Virginie
Walter
Arlene
Bret
Cindy
Don
Emily
Franklin
Gert
Harvey
Irene
Jose
Katia
Lee
Maria
Nate
Ophelia
Philippe
Rina
Sean
Tammy
Vince
Whitney
Alberto
Beryl
Chris
Debby
Ernesto
Florence
Gordon
Helene
Isaac
Joyce
Kirk
Leslie
Michael
Nadine
Oscar
Patty
Rafael
Sandy
Tony
Valerie
William
Andrea
Barry
Chantal
Dorian
Erin
Fernand
Gabrielle
Humberto
Ingrid
Jerry
Karen
Lorenzo
Melissa
Nestor
Olga
Pablo
Rebekah
Sebastien
Tanya
Van
Wendy



 
Preparation Checklist
  • Is your disaster supplies kit ready?
  • Gas up your vehicles.
  • Have your evacuation plan ready
  • Secure loose items outside of your home.
  • Frequently check on the progress of the storm.
  • Check batteries and stock up on canned food, first-aid supplies,
  • drinking water and medications.
  • Store valuables and papers in waterproof containers.
  • Secure your boat.
  • Inform loved ones as to where you will be during the storm.
  • Insure your weather radio is in working condition.
  • Locate you local shelters.

Basic Emergency Supplies


The best time to assemble a 3-day disaster supplies kit is well before the storm hits. Many of these are common household items. Store enough supplies for at least 3 days, and if possible, for 7 days.

 

  • Easy to carry water tight container (for all of your items)
  • Water - 1 gallon per person per day along with a water purification kit or bleach
  • First aid kit and first aid book
  • Mosquito repellent and sunscreen
  • Pre-cooked, non-perishable foods, like canned meats, granola bars, peanut butter, intsant soup, cereals, dried fruit, powdered milk, etc.
  • Portable camp stove or girll with extra propane
  • Non-electric can opener and waterproof lighter
  • Paper plates, cups, utensils, paper towels
  • Aluminum foil, oven mits, trash bags
  • Baby supplies: formula, bottle, pacifier, diapers, baby wipes, etc.
  • Anti-bacterial hand wipes or gel
  • Blanket or sleeping bag per person
  • Battery operated alarm clock, radio and/or TV with extra batteries
  • Flashlight with extra batteries
  • Essential medications (& copies of perscriptions)
  • Bar soap, toilet articles
  • Toilet paper, feminine hygiene supplies
  • Cash and change
  • Seasonal change of clothing, including sturdy shoes and work gloves
  • Cleaning supplies, hand tools, duct tape, rope, etc.
  • Documents, backup disks of important computer files, medical history info, photo ID's
  • Camera, books, games, cards, etc.
  • Food, water, leash and carrier for pets.

Securing Your Property & Insurance



Some low cost mitigation measures you can take to protect yourself and your home from losses from wind and/or flooding:

  • Analyze your home's structural weaknesses
  • If you are building a new home, consider a hip roof with a pitch of 30 degrees or less
  • Install storm shutters to protect windows
  • Install braces to give additional support to garage doors
  • Plant vegetation to serve as wind breaks
  • Buy flood insurance (see below)
  • Move valuables and appliances out of the basement
  • Make sure that any flood-proofing efforts are in compliance with the minimum NFIP requirements, and with state and local building codes.

The North Carolina Dept. of Insurance offers these tips for maximizing your personal safety and minimizing your property & financial losses.

Homeowners should review their insurance policies with their agents.

Flood Insurance can be obtained by qualifying property owners by contacting your local agent or through the National Flood Insurance Proram: (800-638-7048)

The Beach Plan is a program designed for coastal property owners. It offers coverage for fire, lightning, wind, and hail. Obtain more information by calling: (800-662-7048) or visit http://www.ncjua-nciua.org/

Residents living in rental property should consider purchasing renter's insurance to cover losses of personal property within the rental unit.

If you evacuate, take a copy of your policy with you.

Additional tips for hurricane and storm preparation are also available at the Department of Insurance or you may contact the Consumer Services Division of the Department of Insurance toll-free (in state) at 800-546-5664.

Pet Safety


Pets are not allowed in public shelters for health and space reasons, so arrangements need to be made in advance for your pets.

In the event of a disaster, if you must evacuate, the most important thing you can do for your pets is to evacuate them too.

Pets are not allowed at most hotels and motels in North Carolina, so emergency arrangements for them may require careful planning.

  • Keep your pet's vaccinations up to date. Pet shelters may require proof of vaccines.
  • Keep your pet on a leash with proper identification
  • Have a properly-sized pet carrier for each animal...large enough for the animal to stand and turn around.

Animals brought to a pet shelter are required to have:

  • Proper identification collar and rabies tag
  • Proper identification on all belongings
  • A carrier
  • A leash
  • An ample supply of food, water and food bowls
  • Any necessary medications
  • Specific care instructions
  • Newspapers or trash bags for clean-up

If you must leave your pet behind, prepare an appropriate area for them. Put the pet in a carrier in an interior closet or bathroom with plenty of water, food, toys and blankets.


       
 


This material is provided as a public service. Its purpose is to increase hurricane awareness. They key to survival is advance preparation!


When A Watch Is Issued
When A Warning Is Issued


Monitor storm reports

Make arrangements for pets

Check supplies

Fuel automobile

Store non-perishable foods

Store fresh drinking water

Protect glass openings

Buy materials for emergency repairs


Monitor storm reports

Leave mobile home

Prepare for high winds

Protect windows

Relocate boats on trailers

Check boat mooring lines

Store valuables and paperwork

Prepare for floods and tornadoes

Double-check survival supplies

 
Safety Reminders
 

If You Evacuate

If You Stay at Home

If you choose to evacuate, follow these tips:

  • Take your disaster supplies kit
  • Bring pillows and blankets
  • Have a safe place to go
  • Bring extra cash
  • Enact your pet plan
  • Bring important family documents in a waterproof container
  • Secure your home
  • Follow your County Evacuation Map
  • Don't drive on flooded roads
  • Follow officials' instructions
  • Stay away from downed power lines
  • After the threat, listen to local officials for the all clear

If you are not able to evacuate, it is best to stay in a shelter. In the event of a disaster there are shelters set up for those with special medical needs.

If you do choose to stay at home, follow these tips:

  • Cover all windows and doors with shutters or other shielding materials
  • Have extra cash on hand
  • Have a weather radio on hand for frequent updates
  • Follow instruction of local officials
  • Stay away from windows and doors
  • Go to an interior room on the 1st floor
  • Have a family communication plan
  • Remain indoors even during the eye of the storm

 

Generator Safety

Portable generators are a good source of alternative power if an outage occurs, but they should only be used in emergency situations. An improperly installed or operated generator can be deadly!

More information on generator safety can be found here.

After A Hurricane


Power Outages

When a hurricane strikes, it often causes widespread power outages. Restoring power after a major outage is a big job that involves much more than simply throwing a switch or removing a tree from a line.
Our goal is to restore power SAFELY to the greatest number of people in the shortest time possible.

Stay clear of trees that may have fallen on power lines.

Remember, a power outage may effect thousands of other customers, so please be patient as we work to restore your power safely and efficiently.

More info on power restoration can be found here.


What to do after a Hurricane

  • Contact local officials to see if it is safe to return
  • Check with officials for a safe route to return
  • Make sure your residence is safe
  • Be cautious of downed power lines
  • Follow all instructions of local officials
  • Do not drink water until notified that it is safe
  • Be cautious of spoiled food
  • Take inventory of destroyed and damaged property
  • Contact your insurance company

The Recovery


Responsibility for the cleanup falls to numerous local, state, and federal agencies. A local disaster coordinator/director or his representative will be on hand to help residents in this effort. But, in the meantime, help your neighbors. Recovery quickens with cooperation from all.

  • Notify your insurance company
  • Apply for relief with FEMA
  • Protect property
  • Remember, recover is a team effort

For more information about hurricane preparedness, survival, and relief, visit the Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA) website.


           
        Copyright © 2011 Brunswick County Emergency Services. - All Rights Reserved
Site Design by CarolinaDesignStudios.net